Human Adaptation Over Time

Tickets for this series will not be on sale until January 2021. We expect that it will be presented only as Zoom Webinars.

Humanity has used the land on which they live very differently over the time they have inhabited the Earth and this use has mostly been dictated by environmental conditions. This series explores how humanity has adapted to and altered the climate over time. It concludes with a look at the climate change we currently face.

Series Coordinators: Joan Corbett-Fujiki & Ellen Lewis

Series Date: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021 to Thursday, April 1, 2021
Price: 
45.00 CAD
Product variations: 
Title:
Earth History, Changing Climate and the Evolution of Life
0.00 CAD
Date: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021
Time: 
10:00 AM
12:00 PM
Location: 
On-line as a Zoom Webinar

The evolution of life forms and the increase in biodiversity of our planet is recorded in the rocks of the Earth. What is the nature of that record that extends over nearly four billion years? These rocks record the climate of our Earth, and show that the increase in biodiversity is not linear through time, but marked by mass extinctions. Were these climatically driven?

About the lecturer 

Tony Davis

Tony Davis is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Geography, University of Toronto. He thinks of himself as an environmental historian. His research focussed on the reconstruction of past environments using pollen analysis. This included collaboration with Gary Crawford in Japan and southern Ontario.

Title:
Out of the Deep Freeze Came the First Farmers; or Did They?
0.00 CAD
Date: 
Thursday, March 4, 2021
Time: 
10:00 AM
12:00 PM
Location: 
On-line as a Zoom Webinar

It is often suggested that modern society developed because of agricultural practices, and that farming may have started as the last ice age ended. Different plants and animals were domesticated in different areas and there is often a link between climate change and agricultural practices. What were people doing 20,000 to 5,000 years ago and how was that related to climate change?

About the lecturer 

Gary Crawford

Gary W. Crawford (FRSC) is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. He is an archaeologist specializing in agricultural origins and the relationships between people and plants in ancient societies. For the last 45 years he has been investigating the origins of food production, domestication, resilience, and ancient human ecology in northeastern North America, Japan, and China. He has collaborated with Tony Davis on a number of these projects.

Title:
Monsoons, Deserts, Rice and Millet in Early China
0.00 CAD
Date: 
Thursday, March 11, 2021
Time: 
10:00 AM
12:00 PM
Location: 
On-line as a Zoom Webinar

Two areas in China; the relatively dry north Yellow River basin and the warmer, wetter Yangzi valley in the south will be examined to see whether the very distinct climates were responsible for the differences in agricultural practices of the two areas with pigs, millet and soybean being raised in the north and pigs, rice, peaches and water chestnuts raised further south.

About the lecturer 

Gary Crawford

Gary W. Crawford (FRSC) is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. He is an archaeologist specializing in agricultural origins and the relationships between people and plants in ancient societies. For the last 45 years he has been investigating the origins of food production, domestication, resilience, and ancient human ecology in northeastern North America, Japan, and China. He has collaborated with Tony Davis on a number of these projects.

Title:
The Enigma of the Jomon Culture in Japan
0.00 CAD
Date: 
Thursday, March 18, 2021
Time: 
10:00 AM
12:00 PM
Location: 
On-line as a Zoom Webinar

Culture in the Japanese islands started similarly to Chinese culture at the end of the Ice Age.  However, a distinctive and different way of life evolved on these islands that lasted 15,000 years.  Called the Jomon Culture and largely felt to be hunter gatherer in nature the lecture will examine the concept of resilience and why agriculture did not develop as the climate stabilized as it did in nearby China.

About the lecturer 

Gary Crawford

Gary W. Crawford (FRSC) is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. He is an archaeologist specializing in agricultural origins and the relationships between people and plants in ancient societies. For the last 45 years he has been investigating the origins of food production, domestication, resilience, and ancient human ecology in northeastern North America, Japan, and China. He has collaborated with Tony Davis on a number of these projects.

Title:
Climate Change & the Rise and Fall of Civilizations; El NIino (ENSO) & Its Impact
0.00 CAD
Date: 
Thursday, March 25, 2021
Time: 
10:00 AM
12:00 PM
Location: 
On-line as a Zoom Webinar

There is a link between the effects of El Nino on the cultures of the west coast of central and South America and the droughts and famines of India. The demise of Moche, Nazca and Mayan civilizations in the Americas are attributed to ENSO events but El Nino may also have caused the Harappan civilization of the Indus basin and other famines in India to occur by altering the timing and effectiveness of the Asian monsoon.

About the lecturer 

Tony Davis

Tony Davis is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Geography, University of Toronto. He thinks of himself as an environmental historian. His research focussed on the reconstruction of past environments using pollen analysis. This included collaboration with Gary Crawford in Japan and southern Ontario.

Title:
Contemporary Climate Change. Global Warming – Its Causes & Consequences
0.00 CAD
Date: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021
Time: 
10:00 AM
12:00 PM
Location: 
On-line as a Zoom Webinar

The climatic response of our activities is altering the Earth’s surface and the behaviour of its atmosphere in complex ways. Our climate is becoming less stable and subject to greater extremes which will effect agriculture as well as political and economic stability. Rising sea levels are already being seen and these alone may displace over a billion people.

About the lecturer 

Tony Davis

Tony Davis is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Geography, University of Toronto. He thinks of himself as an environmental historian. His research focussed on the reconstruction of past environments using pollen analysis. This included collaboration with Gary Crawford in Japan and southern Ontario.